Mitchell Street Market Lofts raise up the near south side

October 24, 2012
by Monique Collins

More than 150 people are on the waiting list for an apartment at the Mitchell Street Market Lofts development. (Photo by Sue Vliet)

(Photo by Sue Vliet)

What was once a brownfield on a city-owned vacant lot is now an affordable housing development, and that was a reason to celebrate.

The recent grand opening of Mitchell Street Market Lofts, 1948 W. Mitchell St., drew community members and elected officials to the development, home to 24 rent-to-own units, retail space and a street-level farmers market.

The $6.1 million project was financed through a public / private partnership consisting of WHEDA, City of Milwaukee, the Milwaukee Metropolitan Sewage District, Chase, the DNR, the Federal Home Loan Bank, LISC and the Mitchell Street Market developers.

Sherry Terrell-Webb and Tina Anderson conceived the Mitchell Street Market Lofts development while taking part in Marquette University’s Associates in Commercial Real Estate (ACRE) program, which trains minority students for commercial real estate careers. Terrell-Webb and Anderson developed the project in response to the Near Southside Neighborhood Plan.

LISC Milwaukee sponsors the real estate program, helping to update the curriculum, teach courses and offer financial support, according to Dawn Hutchinson-Weiss, LISC director of communications.

Hutchinson-Weiss said LISC also provided a $10,000 grant to support a green roof for the development.

The apartments were fully leased within one month of availability, with more than 150 families on the waiting list.

“(The success) is due to a combination of location, the look of the development and the building’s amenities,” said Robert Lemke, a professor of architecture at Milwaukee School of Engineering and the students’ former instructor.

Terrell-Webb said the Mitchell Street Market Lofts have had a major impact on the community’s revitalization. “There wasn’t any new development, so we thought it would bring new housing, obviously, and give the farmers market an ability to continue serving the community year-round,” she said.

The Mitchell Street Farmers Market is run by Growing Power, a nonprofit urban farm. The market, which is up and running, offers indoor and outdoor space for the farmers, according to Lemke.

“There weren’t a lot of healthy food choices in the area,” Lemke said. “Now, (community members) have access to fresh vegetables.

Terrell-Webb said the Mitchell Street Market Lofts tenants love the year-round farmers market. “They can just go downstairs and get their fruits and vegetables for the day,” she said.

The development has made the neighborhood more desirable, according to Lemke. A new business and the expansion of another local business have created 10 new jobs, he added.

“This was the first new project in the area in a long time,” he said. “We like to think that when people look at it, they see a quality idea.”

Comments

One Response to “Mitchell Street Market Lofts raise up the near south side”

  1. UNKNOWN says:

    Mitchell streets market lofts is the worst! They’re always in your apartment, they’ve gone up almost 50.00 on the rent, 25.00 dollars per year. To top it all off the apartment manager who’s suppose to do house checks before allowing a tenant to move clearly didn’t do her job because everyone had ROACHES! It was a very scary situation. You get to know your neighbors more than you’d like because it’s only one elevator and its not that big of a building. Your only allowed one parking space even if you have two cars and one day someone broke into this building and ram shacked some of the cars. Everyone’s car had been touched, however there are cameras. The apartments are very beautiful and spacious for a boy friend and girlfriend with out children. When we first moved in the apartments were 525, rent is now 575. Its a 2 bedrm, 2 bathrm, 1027 sq ft apartment.

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